Top 10 Best Cancer Fighting Spices (Part 4: 7 & 8 Parsley and Cilantro)

How cancer patients get the most out of parsley and cilantro and learn how to tell them apart.

The other day my beautiful bride asked me to run down to Sprouts and grab some parsley. I jumped on my bicycle and rode to the grocer. I was amazed to see and realize how much parsley and cilantro look alike. I know the smell of cilantro so I picked a leaf, crush it in my fingers and realized that I was smelling cilantro; it was the other member of the parsley family that she asked me to buy. These sister superfood spices are not the same. Let’s take a look at superfood spices 7 & 8

Here are the, cancer free living, top 10 best cancer fighting spices:

1. Turmeric
2. Ginger
3. Garlic
4. Saffron
5. Rosemary
6. Cinnamon
7. Parsley
8. Cilantro
9. Basil
10. Oregano

The history of Parsley

It looks like the Greeks discovered Parsley first. The name parsley comes from the Greek word, Petroselinum, it starts with ‘Petra’. In the Bible Jesus called, Simon the Fisherman, Peter, and explained that Petra means little stone. Based on folklore, the first parsley was found on a hill side among a lot of small stones. I found a more in-depth discussion on the history of Parsley at: http://theepicentre.com/spice/parsley/

The Romans used parsley before recorded history. It was discovered in tombs, made into a wreath and hung on the wall to keep the air fresh. The reason Romans and the Greeks did not eat, this superfood spice, is the swamp spice Hemlock, which is extremely deadly and looks a lot like parsley, in the wild.

Commoners throughout Europe began to eat Parsley as a spice and breath freshener long before the upper-class people. Parsley was used as medicine long before it was used for food1.

How does Parsley help fight cancer?

There are some very powerful essential oils that have shown promise in the inhibition of tumors. According to the, Scientific World Journal2 the oils monoterpenes such as myristicin, limonene, eugenol and alpha-thujene have been shown to inhibit tumor growth and the prevention of tumors starting3.
Another powerful part of Parsley are the Flavonoids like apigenin and luteolin they are strong antioxidants that protect the cell from oxidative damage and stress.
Lastly a couple more benefits are: Antibacterial and Anti-inflammatory

Read more: http://naturalsociety.com/parsley-health-benefits-growing-parsley-medicine/#ixzz4pmNY9VEB

How to you eat or consume Parsley:

Not all Parsley is the same. There are 3 varieties of this superfood. Flat leaf or Italian parsley, Curley leaf and Soup Parsley. Curley leaf is the most common in the U.S. This is the herb that you place on the salad, along the side, to give your dish that splash of color.
Here is a short video on washing and chopping parsley for a meal like soup:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLLe2kaJzBo

Last year I grew parsley in my garden just to see if I could. It came on like gang busters. I started using it in teas, garnish on protein meals, and I used it in soups to balance the overall flavors. I found parsley was very refreshing in a smoothie. Finally, I dried a couple batches, which is very easy to do; I stored it for the summer months. In Arizona summer is our off season for gardens and September is the start of our spring. Bottom line, parsley is easy to dry, can be used in numerous soups, salads and main course meals.

The history of Cilantro

No one seems to know the origin of cilantro. There is a historical reference to cilantro and its seeds called coriander, in the Bible Exodus 16:31. Moses is describing the Manna when he writes, “it is like white coriander seed, and the taste of it was like wafers made with honey”. Coriander seeds have been discovered in Egyptian tombs, which date back at least 5000 years. The Chinese have used the cilantro and coriander seeds for centuries. It only conjecture or a guess if cilantro traveled from China to the middle east or the other way around. There is a lot more detail and interesting reading about the history of cilantro and coriander, at: http://www.indepthinfo.com/cilantro/history.shtml

How Cilantro helps fight cancer

There was a day when cilantro was a big player in the cancer fighting world. Unfortunately, it is now illegal to mention herbal remedies and their ability to fight cancer. What I can say is that cilantro can detox your body. All the toxic waste, like soda pop, builds up in our cells, which causes a breakdown of the DNA and the door is open for cancer. Long term use of cilantro can strengthen your urinary tract which will stave off infection which could degenerate into cancer. Cilantro is a superfood and it will bless your entire body every time you eat it off your dinner plate.4

The best way to eat Cilantro

Cilantro is also called Mexican or Chinese parsley. It is not parsley but is in the same family. Garnish a high protein meal with Cilantro. Chop it into a soup. Learn to juice cilantro; mix it in with a carrot, some spinach, fresh ginger root and a beetroot. Your energy will go off the chart.

Since I was raised in Arizona, I love Mexican food. Cilantro makes every Mexican food meal better. I love cilantro in my eggs and peppers. Remember to always add the cilantro at the very last moment. Unfortunately, it loses some of its flavor and health benefits when it is heated too much. In soup, the flavor blends nicely.

For further reading, Dr. Axe has a very good page on Cilantro: https://draxe.com/cilantro-benefits/

In conclusion:

We have taken a short but amazing journey studying about the powerful superfood Parsley and Cilantro. Remember the best way to tell them apart is the smell. Even though they are both in the carrot family both parsley and cilantro are unique and powerful superfood spices. Superfoods protect you from cancer, this is an important lesson to remember. Cancer free living begins with being aware of what you are eating.
Please leave your thoughts and tell me your living cancer free story.

References:

  1. http://www.indepthinfo.com/parsley/history.shtml 
  2. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/2014/953451/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1470060/
  4. http://www.naturalhealth365.com/cilantro.html/
  1. Hey Larry, We have quite a bit of Rosemary (not her Baby) if you ever want some. I seem to remember some of those ingredients (in Cilantro) from Pharmacognosy (1964). Interesting course on natural botanicals. I have a story to tell you sometime about that course. Claudette doesn’t appear to be interested in your offer, unfortunately. Only so much I can do here. Maybe I’ll have you check mine. She has appointment with MD Psychiatrist Tuesday. Changes have to be made

    Reply

  2. Hi Dale,
    I do not know if you noticed but I have Rosemary lining the driveway on the West side. Thank you for leaving a comment. Now that the ice has been broken I hope other people figure this out. God bless you brother.

    Reply

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